Song of Salvation

“He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love” (Song of Solomon 2:4).

Song of Solomon is, quite frankly, a rather creepy book of the Bible. It describes in almost scandalous detail the relationship between a husband and wife, not skirting around their enraptured delight in one another. Many biblical scholars throughout the years have attempted to read Song of Solomon in light of Christ’s relationship with the Church, viewing the entire book as nothing more than an allegory. While this interpretation is suspect at best, it is still intriguing to read the book in light of the knowledge that the New Testament does indeed name the Church the Bride of Christ.

The Bible uses many analogies to describe the relationship between God and His people. A couple of favorites are a ruler and his people or father and his child. But perhaps the most beautiful of the biblical analogies is the comparison of Christ to a bridegroom and the Church as His Bride. Such a love is unlike any other. Song of Solomon showcases this love, with the husband in the song taking frank delight in every aspect of his wife. She is radiant to him, and he loves her with a jealous love. She is his, and he makes sure everyone else knows it. The bride, for her part, adores her husband with a sincere purity, overwhelmed by the knowledge that he loves her. She wants him more than anyone else. She gives herself freely to him, and their love only grows as their relationship deepens.

This is the relationship to which God has chosen to compare Himself and His redeemed people. God loves us with a deep, powerful, incomprehensible love. He has bought us with His own blood, and He will allow no one else to touch us. We are His and His alone. Because of His love, we love Him in return. We adore Him, worship Him, are overwhelmed by what He has done for us. Can there be a more wonderful picture of His love for us than that which is presented in the Song of Solomon?

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